Call On 01922 620008 |

Non-Performing Loan (NPL)

Non-performing loan

A non-performing loan is a type of loan that is not generating any income for the lender. In other words, the borrower is not making any payments on the loan. This can be a significant problem for both the borrower and the lender. This article post will discuss everything you need to know about non-performing loans.

What is a Non-Performing Loan?

A non-performing loan is a type of loan that is not generating any income for the lender, as the borrower has stopped making repayments. A non-performing loan will be a major cause of concern for both lender and borrower and will have severe repercussions. There are many reasons why a borrower may stop making payments on their loan. Maybe the borrower lost their job and can no longer afford the payments. Or maybe the borrower is using the loan for a business venture that has not yet generated any income.

Whatever the reason, when a borrower stops making payments, it becomes a non-performing loan. There are, of course, consequences for this being the case. For example, the lender may charge late fees or increase the interest rate. The borrower may also damage the borrower’s credit score, and can even result in repossession for secured loans.

How do Non-Performing Loans work?

If you are a borrower, it is important to understand how non-performing loans work. As we mentioned before, there are consequences for not making payments on your loan. Firstly, the lender may charge late fees, this means that you will increase your balance, making it harder to repay the debt. In some cases, the interest rate on the loan may increase along with your monthly payments.

Your credit score may be damaged, making it difficult to get a loan in the future, causing financial strain in your life for many years to come.

It is also important to understand that you are not the only one affected by a non-performing loan. The lender is also impacted negatively. When a borrower stops making payments, the lender does not receive any income from the loan. This can cause problems for the lender, and can even lead to regulatory problems if a large proportion of their loan book falls into arrears.

What are the types of non-performing loans?

There are two main types of non-performing loans: secured and unsecured. A secured loan is a loan that is backed by collateral. This means that if you default on the loan, the lender can take your property and sell it to repay the loan. The most common type of secured loan is a mortgage.

An unsecured loan is a loan that is not backed by collateral. This means that if you default on the loan, the lender cannot take your property. The most common type of unsecured loan is a credit card.

In either case, if a loan becomes a non-performing loan, it can have serious consequences for both the borrower and the lender. If it’s a secured loan, the collateral may be taken. If it’s an unsecured loan, the borrower may have to declare bankruptcy.

How to calculate the non-performing loan ratio

The non-performing loan ratio is the percentage of loans that are not being repaid. To calculate the non-performing loan ratio, you divide the number of non-performing loans by the total number of loans. For example, if there are 100 loans and 20 of them are non-performing, then the non-performing loan ratio would be 20%. 

From a lender’s perspective, let’s say The Money Bank has a loan portfolio of £300,000,000 (300 million), but £10 million of these are non-performing loans. we divide £10,000,000 by £300,000,000, or 10/300, which gives us 0.03, or 3%. The NPL ratio for Money Banks is, therefore, 3%.

As a formula, this would read;

Non-Performing Loans (Value or the number of loans) / Total Portfolio / 100 = The NPL ratio as a percentage.

When does a loan become non-performing?

The first way that a loan can become non-performing is if the borrower stops making payments. This can happen for several reasons, including job loss, illness, or simply because the borrower can no longer afford the payments. Another is that the term of an interest-only loan ends without the loan being repaid. This account will automatically fall into default, even if the repayments are maintained.

What are the disadvantages of a Non-Performing Loan?

There are no advantages to non-performing loans, but there are several disadvantages. They are:

The lender’s capital is tied up.When dealing with non-performing loans, the lender could face problems since their capital is tied up in loans that they aren’t getting repaid for. This is also reflected in the fact your cash flow is reduced, meaning you can’t give out more credit nor make more money, potentially stunning the company’s growth.
As a borrower with a non-performing loan, your credit score will be affected. This is because if the borrower defaults on the loan, it will show up on their credit report and lower their credit score.
A non-performing loan can create legal problemsA non-performing loan can also lead to legal problems for the lender. This is because if the borrower doesn’t make payments and the lender tries to seize the collateral, there could be a legal battle between the two parties.
As a lender, you may experience reduced income.This is because you’re not receiving repayments on the credit you’ve given out, therefore you’re not getting the money back, nor the money you would have made from the interest of the loan.

What is the difference between Nonperforming Loan (NPL) and Reperforming Loan (RPL)?

A non-performing loan (NPL) is a loan that is not being repaid. A performing loan, on the other hand, is a loan that is being repaid. It’s really that simple. If a borrower is not making payments, then the loan is considered non-performing. If the borrower is making payments, then the loan is performing.

However, there are a few things to keep in mind. First, a loan can become non-performing even if the borrower is still making some payments. This can happen if the borrower falls behind on their payments or if the payments are not enough to cover the interest and principal. Second, a loan can become non-performing even if the borrower is up to date with their payments. This can happen if the lender seizes the collateral or if the property value decreases so much that it’s worth less than what is owed on the loan.

Lastly, a loan can also become non-performing if it is sold to another lender at a discount. This happens when the original lender believes they will not be able to collect the full amount of the loan, so they sell it to another lender for less than what is owed.